“I Will Not Leave You Comfortless”

My babies have never been exceptionally good sleepers. I have never been able to lay them down and have them go to sleep on their own (not consistently, anyway). It takes them a long time (compared to other babies) to sleep long stretches or through the night. They have never been “marathon nappers.” But honestly, I am okay with all of this now that I know what normal infant sleep is.

Still, I have had several people wonder why I don’t just let my babies “cry it out” so that they’ll sleep better. Here’s my experience.

When my oldest was a baby (probably 8-10 months), I was desperate for her to sleep through the night. After all, her cousin who’s the same age had been sleeping through the night for months. I thought something was wrong with my baby, or that I was doing something wrong. I was exhausted and worried and stressed. Almost everyone I talked to, and almost everything I looked at online, suggested leaving her to cry it out. I didn’t like the idea, but I finally decided to give it a try. I thought it was my only option.

So one night after our bedtime routine my husband and I put our daughter down in her crib awake, kissed her goodnight, and walked out. Now, at this point, some babies will fuss for a couple minutes and then go to sleep. Seems like a great solution! But that is not what our daughter did. She was extremely upset (which really is understandable). But we left anyway, and we watched the clock until it was “time” to go back in. I went back in and tried to comfort her (which didn’t work because I didn’t pick her up) and then left again. She screamed bloody murder. I went back to the living room to diligently wait with my husband. But I felt sick inside. Every instinct inside me was screaming at me to go pick up my baby, to hold her and comfort her. But I was supposed to be “strong.” After all, if I didn’t do this, she would never learn to sleep on her own. It was for her own good. Right? I wasn’t so sure. I desperately wanted to throw this whole idea out the window, but I felt like I needed permission.

Finally I said something to my husband. Something like, “Honey, I don’t want to do this.” And then he said, “So let’s not do it. Go get her.” That was all I needed.

I went in to my baby girl and picked her up. I sat with her in the rocking chair and held her tight while she tried to calm down. I cried with her. And then, as we sat there in the stillness that followed, I had some thoughts enter my mind. I wondered what the Savior would do in this situation.

“Then the Holy Spirit enters into my thoughts, saying:

‘Love one another as Jesus loves you.
Try to show kindness in all that you do.
Be gentle and loving in deed and in thought,
For these are the things Jesus taught.'”
(I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus, Children’s Songbook, pg 78)
snugglinginfant

Credit: Jean Keaton

I pictured my Savior with my little girl. I couldn’t imagine Him leaving her to cry by herself. In fact, He promised His disciples, and has in effect promised all of us:

 “I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.”
(John 14:18)

I felt peace in my decision to do the same for my daughter that night.

I have heard some argue that the Lord does require us to do hard things on our own, but I disagree. He does ask us to do hard things, but we never have to do them alone.

 

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 Since that time I have educated myself about infant and toddler sleep and what is normal, and have learned that we as parents do not need to (and shouldn’t) fight our God-given instincts and intuition. Even if we do nothing to encourage it, children naturally learn to sleep on their own eventually. (And for those who just can not wait for that to happen in their child’s own time – and I get it – there are gradual, gentle ways to encourage independent sleep in an older baby or toddler.) God created us the way He did on purpose – He knew what He was doing. So our parental instincts to hold and comfort our child will not create “bad habits” that can’t be broken, and our child is not doomed to a life without sleep unless we traumatize her. We need not fear. “For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind” (2 Timothy 1:7).

I feel it’s important to note that I do not judge other parents for making a different choice. Truly. Especially when mental health challenges are involved. I do believe that God can heal all things and that we can all eventually be just like Jesus and do as He would do. But I also know that it’s not always so black and white. Each of us are doing the best we can with the knowledge and experience and abilities we have. We all need support and kindness and love through this journey called parenthood. I hope and pray that this post will offer encouragement and help and hope to those who need it.

And for those who feel, as I did, like you need permission not to sleep train, here it is. Go to your baby. Hold her, cuddle her, love on her. Sleep with her if you wish to. This stage will not last forever. Trust your God-given instincts, your intuition. Choose love. Parent with faith and not with fear. It will all be okay.

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